Mood disorders

Mood disorder may be a psychological state class that health professionals use to broadly describe all kinds of depression and bipolar disorders. Children, teens, and adults can have mood disorders. However, children and teens don’t always have the same symptoms as adults. It’s harder to diagnose mood disorders in children because they aren’t always ready to express how they feel. Sometimes, life's problems can trigger depression. Being fired from employment, getting divorced, losing a beloved, death within the family and financial trouble, to call a couple of, all are often difficult and dealing with the pressure may be troublesome. These life events and stress can cause feelings of sadness or depression or make a mood disorder harder to manage. The risk of depression in women is almost twice as high because it is for men. Once an individual within the family has this diagnosis, their brothers, sisters, or children have a better chance of an equivalent diagnosis. In addition, relatives of individuals with depression also are at increased risk for manic depression. Once an individual within the family features a diagnosis of manic depression, the prospect for his or her brothers, sisters or children to possess an equivalent diagnosis is increased. Relatives of individuals with bipolar also are at increased risk for depression. Depending on age and therefore the sort of mood disorder, an individual may have different symptoms of depression. The following are the foremost common symptoms of a mood disorder: • Ongoing sad, anxious, or “empty” mood • Feeling helpless • Having low self-esteem • Feeling inadequate or worthless • Excessive guilt • Repeating thoughts of death or suicide, wishing to die, or attempting suicide (Note: People with this symptom should get treatment right away!) • Loss of interest in usual activities or activities that were once enjoyed, including sex • Relationship problems • Trouble sleeping or sleeping too much and concentrating • Changes in appetite and/or weight • Decreased energy • A decrease in the ability to make decisions • Frequent physical complaints (for example, headache, stomachache or tiredness) that don’t recover with treatment • Deed or threats of deed from home • Very sensitive to failure or rejection • Irritability, hostility or aggression Mood disorders are a real medical disorder. A psychiatrist or other psychological state professional usually diagnoses mood disorders through an entire medical record and psychiatric evaluation. Mood disorders can often be treated with Psychotherapy, most often cognitive-behavioral and/or interpersonal therapy. This therapy is concentrated on changing the person’s distorted views of himself or herself and therefore the environment around him or her. It also helps to enhance interpersonal relationship skills, and identifying stressors within the environment and the way to avoid them.

  • peripartum depression
  • Psychotic depression
  • Premenstrual dysphoric disorder
  • Intermittent explosive disorder

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